We CAN agree with and not agree with Jason Collins at the same damn time

There’s a real problem in the country. It’s called Hypocriticism. And I can’t stand it.

I coudn’t stand it when Charles Barkley jumped from Philly, to Phoenix, to Houston looking for a championship ring, but criticized Lebron James for doing the same thing.

I can’t stand it when teams demand loyalty and honor from their athletes when it comes to their contracts. But when a team sees someone who can jump higher, run faster and hit harder, they tear up your contract, trade or release the athelete and ship them off to the highest bidder.

I can’t stand it when government and law enforcement say we should follow the law. But then break the very laws that they set for us, in order for personal gain.

And I definitely can’t stand the fact that people who are for gay rights and demand and march and protest for the rights of gay people, feel that those who do not support their cause or believe in gay lifestyle, are in some way ignorant and discreminatory against gays.

130429024012-jason-collins-profile-single-image-cut

The news of Jason Collins, an active NBA player who is gay broke on Monday afternoon, it opened up a lot of discussions in sports and non sports news. In different circles I”m sure there was talk about how tremendous this occasion was for the Gay and Lesbian community and how finally a person in one of the four major American sports finally accepted themselves for who they are. There was debate about how would he go on with his career (Collins is a free agent this summer) and what teams would show interest in him. And in my circle, there was talk about Mike Wallace and his comments about gays.

Miami Dolphin Wide Receiver Mike Wallace tweeted…

DMRYPtdHe didn’t say “ewww that’s gross” or “you damn fa_ _ _ t why do you like men” or “keep away from me you quear”. He merely stated an opinion, one that a lot of men have I might add, and he was attacked on Twitter for it.

While I will say that “SMH” probably didn’t do much to help his cause, I see nothing wrong with the statement, and neither should anyone else.

Why?

Because Mike Wallace has a right to wonder these things, just as a gay person has the right to wonder if they are gay or straight. So many times I”ve often heard persons who are gay reveal or speak about the time that they realized or learned or felt they were gay. Where’s the wrong in that? Sure they didn’t tweet it nor are they a public athlete that many folks are following on Twitter or supporting on Sundays. But that doesn’t make it any less important.

The same people who want Mike Wallace, Chris Broussard (who I will get to in a minute) and others to just get with “the times” and accept the gay community and their ways, are the same ones who openly criticize Mike Wallace and chastise him for using the one freedom that is cherished most in this country…freedom of speech.

We all want to applaud Dwyane Wade, Tony Parker, Martina Navritilova and all the others who supported Collins in his decision to come out, but we don’t want to hear from the mouths of those who don’t agree with it? I say you must hear from them, because if they keep their thoughts to themselves and just do what’s “politically correct”, their being hypocrites and that’s not cool.

Read this clearly “I’M NOT IN SUPPORT OF GAY BASHING OR DISCRMINATION OF ANY KIND”.

I’m also, like Chris Broussard of ESPN, not in agreement with the homosexual lifestyle.

Broussard and others can not approve of your lifestyle, but still be your friend and be respectful. I don’t consider myself a bigot or ignorant. I just choose to answer to a higher authority when it comes to the subject of homosexuality on Earth. You may choose to forego what it says in the Bible in regards to that subject, however I won’t.

I won’t call names or mock Jason Collins for coming out as a gay athlete. And others shouldn’t mock others or call names because of their beliefs, because that would make you a hypocrite too.

 

About Ed

Ed is one half of the Sports Brothers. He has been in the radio industry for 14 years working in several formats including urban and talk. Upon returning to Miami in 2006 and working at WTPS, he and Jeff Fox were paired up and started The Sports Brothers.

About Ed

Ed is one half of the Sports Brothers. He has been in the radio industry for 14 years working in several formats including urban and talk. Upon returning to Miami in 2006 and working at WTPS, he and Jeff Fox were paired up and started The Sports Brothers.