As a special contribution to thesportsbros.com, my friend and host Felicia Martin decided to let you ladies know how to support your man during this playoff season. It’s never too late to learn football. Enjoy!

If You Can’t Beat Them, Join Them” – 6 ways ladies can improve their football knowledge By: Felicia Martin

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The biggest event on earth is fast approaching.  The culmination of America’s favorite pastime. The SUPER BOWL.  The time when your mate is in this zone where he begins speaking foreign languages, like “ Playoff-ese”, and “Wildcard-ish”.  Of course, this all sounds like jibberish to you or some strange translation of “Babe take the credit card and I’ll see you later.” But alas, it is not some weird health issue he is having; this is about the Super Bowl and everything around it.  The Super Bowl, is very important to him and like any good girlfriend/wife, what is important to him is important to you, right?  Right.  So here are 6 simple things you can do so you can be  a relevant part of the conversation.

  • Find a reason to root for HIS team.   Women are emotionally attached to things.  So find a way to connect to the game. Not the game of football, just to his team.  Why does he love the Giants?  Why does everything have to be Aqua and Orange?  Why does he not let anyone say anything bad about Tony Romo? Even if you end up thinking his reasons are crazy, the fact that you asked will make you seem more open, and are at least trying. That way if and when you get something wrong about the game, he’ll feel a little bit more tolerant.
  • Find a play you want to see happen. This is where ESPN comes in handy.  Watch something like Top 10 plays or even watch your local news sports casts. What was the big play?  What did the sportscaster talk about the most.  Study the play carefully.  Listen as the announcer describe what is happening, and then look for it to happen again.  That’s how I fell in love with basketball.  Kobe Bryant had done some great move, and the guys around me kept talking about it all night.  I wanted to know what was causing all that conversation.  I found out and when I saw the play for myself, and recognized it, I gained an appreciation for the talent and skill of the game.

 

  • Listen to the announcers as they describe the plays.  The announcers can be the best teachers of the game.  They break down plays, gameplan, coaching failures, penalties, how games affect each other.  They are a wealth of information.  If you listen to them carefully, your football knowledge will go up.  And remember, slow motion is your best friend.  During slow motion, you have a chance to actually see the mechanics of the play and see what the big deal was. After seeing a great play in slow motion, rewind the TV and see if you can catch it in real time.

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  • Get the basics down.  Once you know the basics, you can build upon that.  I’ll even help you out and give some to you now:
    • In football there’s an OFFENSE and DEFENSE.  Offense is the team with the ball, the object is to score a touchdown worth 6 points.  The Defense’s job, the team without he ball, is to prevent that from happening.
    • The offense has 4 “attempts” called downs.  They have to move the ball on average 10 yards to gain more downs, otherwise ball belongs to the other team.  The object is to keep moving the ball down the field in order to score a touchdown.
    • The game has four 15 minute quarters. The game itself is played in 4 quarters.  At the end of the four quarters, whoever has the most points wins.
  • Learn penalties.  Listening to the referees is very educational.  Listen for cues like if your man claps or screams “bulls***” when the ref calls the penalty.  Also, look for what may have happened when your man is calling for a flag to be thrown.  Learning penalties enables you to watch the game with a closer eye, because you know what you are looking for.  When you see it, and identify it for yourself, especially before the ref, that is a triumphant moment.  I’ll give you an easy one. 
    • False Start –  Right before the offense “starts”, while they are lined up on the ball, if anyone of the offensive linemen (the person  handing the ball to the QB and everyone lined up along either side of him) moves before the ball does, that is a false start.  Pushes the offense 5 yards backwards.  Remember, the object is to gain positive yards and move forward.

 

  • Don’t ask him questions during the game.  Do I even have to explain this one?  You put your  man in a bad place when he is trying to explain to you a pass interference that ends up as a 43-yard penalty, when his team has just made it to First and Goal.  And if you don’t know what I just said, when you hear the announcer say it on TV, don’t ask your man about it right then.  Be impressive, jot it down and ask him about it later.  Give him an opportunity to “coach” you up.

 

  • Don’t go to a Sports Bar to watch a game until you know more.  If you surround yourself with a pit of experts, you might be intimidated or overwhelmed.  Your mate ends up either babysitting you all night, or making excuses for you instead of watching the game.  Or worse yet, he can join the fan flock and totally ignore you for, as you now know, four whole quarters.

Ladies, it is time for us to stop retreating to the mall during the biggest game of the year.   The Super Bowl is acoming and this year you can be in the know instead of bored to death, or causing your man “unnecessary roughness”.  You have about 15 college games and about 10 pro games before the actual big game.  So get to implementing these tips and let me know how your season turns out.   Felicia Martin randrfee@gmail.com Twitter: @YourGirlFee Facebook: Felicia Martin

About Ed

Ed is one half of the Sports Brothers. He has been in the radio industry for 14 years working in several formats including urban and talk. Upon returning to Miami in 2006 and working at WTPS, he and Jeff Fox were paired up and started The Sports Brothers.